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Wokou Ronin
Wokou Ronin
First AppearanceThe Asian Dynasties
Mercenary
Cost200 Coin Icon coin
Age AvailableAges colonial Colonial Age
BuildingSaloon / Monastery
Base Hit Points400
Pop. Use3
Speed4.50
LOS12
Resists30% vs Melee
Melee Damage25
Siege Damage35
Siege Range6
R.O.F.1.5 / 3.0 (Siege)
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The Wokou Ronin is a Japanese mercenary unit introduced in Age of Empires III: The Asian Dynasties. The unit is trained at the Saloon or Monastery.

The unit also exists as a Treasure Guardian, with higher speed and lower attack. Known as the Masterless Samurai, it has the same history and icon.

History Edit

"A “ronin” was a masterless samurai warrior, and literally meant “drifting person.” A samurai became masterless when his master was defeated, or after the samurai lost his master's favor. Since a ronin did not serve any lord, he ceased being a true samurai, as the word “samurai” came has its roots in “saburau,” Japanese for “to serve.” Becoming a ronin was incredibly undesirable. In fact, a samurai that lost his master was expected to commit seppuku or ritual suicide to retain his honor.

The term "wokou" is a combination of the Chinese word “wo,” referring to Japanese, and "kou,” meaning bandit or invasion.

Beginning in the thirteenth century, no group of sailors was as feared or as mighty as the plundering wokou pirates, a clan of Japanese raiders and smugglers who terrified the Chinese and Korean coasts. The first attacks occurred in 1223, triggering immediate calls for the Kamakura shogunate of Japan to corral these scoundrels and prevent further attacks on the Korean coast. In 1227, as a show of strength, the shogun had ninety suspected wokou pirates decapitated before the visiting Korean envoy.

During the Mongol invasions of the mid-thirteenth century, wokou attacks fell in number, most likely due to a heightened military preparedness on the part of both the Japanese and Korean governments. But this did not last. In the late fourteenth century, as central authority in Japan weakened, the wokou took full advantage, even branching out to initiate attacks along the coast of China. They profited highly from a severe trade embargo forced on Japan by the Qin and then Ming Dynasties of China, reaping rewards as black markets flourished. The wokou experienced periods of rise and decline, even attacking China with a makeshift fleet in 1419, but they ultimately became obsolete.

At its peak, the wokou culture was enough to threaten even the most powerful Asian rulers, and to appeal to the most ordinary of citizenry. Many men left behind their lives to seek fortunes at sea. Chinese merchants, militiamen, smugglers, Korean pirates, Portuguese sailors, traders, and even missionaries joined up with the notorious wokou pirates.
"

Masterless Samurai Edit

Masterless Samurai
Wokou Ronin
First AppearanceThe Asian Dynasties
Treasure Guardian
Base Hit Points400
Speed7
LOS12
Resists30% vs Melee
Melee Damage15
Siege Damage30
Siege Range6
R.O.F.1.5 / 3.0 (Siege)
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The Masterless Samurai is the Treasure Guardian version of the Wokou Ronin. It is one of the more dangerous Treasure Guardians in the game.

History Edit

"The samurai were members of the Japanese warrior aristocracy who embodied the bushido code, and rose to power during the rival clan wars of the twelfth century. This bushido belief system - “the way of the warrior” - emphasized an unwavering loyalty to a master, the act of self-sacrifice, and an indifference to pain. From the twelfth century to the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1603, the samurai were the dominant social class in Japan, and many acted as knights in the service of the warring feudal lords.

A “ronin” was a masterless samurai warrior, and literally meant “drifting person.” A samurai became masterless when his master was defeated, or after the samurai lost his master's favor. Since a ronin did not serve any lord, he ceased being a true samurai, as the word “samurai” has its roots in “saburau,” Japanese for “to serve.” Becoming a ronin was incredibly undesirable. In fact, a samurai that lost his master was expected to commit seppuku or ritual suicide to retain his honor.
"

Gallery Edit

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